Petoskey/Emmet, County, MI

PETOSKEY,  MICHIGAN

Petoskey is a city and coastal resort community in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 6,080. It is the county seat of Emmet County.
Petoskey and the surrounding area are notable for being the setting of several of the Nick Adams stories by Ernest Hemingway, who spent his childhood summers on nearby Walloon Lake, as well as being the place where for Calliope, the protagonist of Jeffrey Eugenides' Middlesex, events take a severe and lasting turn. Petoskey was also the location where 50,000 passenger pigeon birds were killed each day in the late 19th century, prior to their complete extinction in the early 20th century.   A state historical marker commemorates the events, including the last great nesting in 1878.   One hunter was reputed to have personally killed "a million birds" and earned $60,000, the equivalent of $1 million dollars today.[6]
Petoskey is also famous for a high concentration of Petoskey stones, the state stone of Michigan. Petoskey is the birthplace of information theorist Claude Shannon and Civil War historian Bruce Catton and is the boyhood home of singer/songwriter Sufjan Stevens.
The name "Petoskey" is said to mean "where the light shines through the clouds" in the language of the Odawa Indians (Little Traverse Bay Band), who are the original inhabitants. The Petoskey stone and the city were named after Chief Ignatius Petosega (1787–1885), who founded the community. Petosega's father was a French Canadian fur trader and his mother was an Odawa (Ottawa) Indian.
This city was the northern terminus of the Chicago and West Michigan Railway.

Part of Northern Michigan, Petoskey is on the southeast shore of the Little Traverse Bay of Lake Michigan at the mouth of the Bear River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.2 square miles (13 km2), of which, 5.0 square miles (13 km2) of it is land and 0.2 square miles (0.52 km2) of it (4.02%) is water. The Petoskey area also is rather hilly and rocky.

At the 2010 Census Petoskey had a population of 5,670. The racial and ethnic make-up of the population was 90.8% non-Hispanic white, 0.7% black or African American, 4.7% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.5% From some other race, 2.1% of two or more races and 1.89% Hispanic or Latino of any race.
As of the census of 2000, there were 6,080 people, 2,700 households, and 1,447 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,210.9 per square mile (467.6/km²). There were 3,342 housing units at an average density of 665.6 per square mile (257.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.18% White, 0.33% African American, 3.17% Native American, 0.81% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.20% from other races, and 1.30% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.17% of the population.
There were 2,700 households out of which 27.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.8% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 46.4% were non-families. 39.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.89.
In the city the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 85.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.2 males.
The median income for a household in the city was $33,657, and the median income for a family was $48,168. Males had a median income of $35,875 versus $25,114 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,259. About 6.6% of families and 12.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.

Airports
The nearest airports with scheduled passenger service are in Pellston Regional Airport[9] and Traverse City Cherry Capital Airport.

Rail
Freight rail service to Petoskey is limited and provided by the Tuscola and Saginaw Bay Railway (TSBY); however, the tracks are owned by the state of Michigan in order to preserve rail service in northern Michigan. Freight traffic includes plastic pellets delivered to a rail/truck transload facility for Petoskey Plastics. Occasional passenger/special excursion trains to Petoskey occur every now and then. Historically, the Northern Arrow and other rail lines provided passenger traffic to Petoskey and Bay View, Michigan from as far as Chicago and St. Louis, but these were discontinued in the late 20th century.

Marina
The City of Petoskey Department of Parks and Recreation operates a 144-slip marina located in Bayfront Park. The marina offers seasonal and transient slips, gasoline, diesel fuel, boat launch, wireless internet, 30/50 AMP power, water, pump-out, restroom/showers, playground and adjacent park grounds. The Gaslight District is connected to Bayfront Park via a pedestrian tunnel. The marina received initial designation as a "Michigan Clean Marina"[10] in May 2007 and was recertified in 2010.[citation needed]

Major highways
 US 31 is a major highway running through the heart of the city. It continues southerly toward Charlevoix, Traverse City and Muskegon and northerly to a terminus near Mackinaw City.
 US 131 has its northern terminus in the city and continues southerly toward Cadillac and Grand Rapids.
 M-119, accessible off US 31 east of the city and Bay View, continues around the north side of Little Traverse Bay to Harbor Springs and then to Cross Village.
 C-58 begins at C-81 just east of the city and continues to Wolverine.
 C-81 is a north-south route passing just to the east of the city.

Media
Newspaper
Petoskey News-Review
Magazines
Traverse, is published monthly with a focus on regional interests.
Local AM radio
WLDR (750) - country; simulcast of WLDR-FM Traverse City
WJML (1110) - talk
WMKT (1270) - news/talk (licensed to Charlevoix, studios in Petoskey)
WMBN (1340) - adult standards
Local FM radio
WTLI (89.3) - contemporary Christian "Smile FM"
WTCK (90.9) - Catholic religious (Charlevoix)
WJOG (91.3) - contemporary Christian "Smile FM"
WTCM (93.5) - country; simulcast of WTCM-FM Traverse City
W237DA (95.3) - translator of WFDX-FM Atlanta (classic hits)
WLXT (96.3) - adult contemporary
WKLZ (98.9) - classic rock; simulcast of WKLT-FM Kalkaska
W259AH (99.7) - translator of WPHN-FM Gaylord (religious)
WICV (100.9) - classical (East Jordan); simulcast of WIAA-FM Interlochen
WCMW (103.9) - CMU Public Radio (Harbor Springs)
WKHQ (105.9) - CHR/top 40 (licensed to Charlevoix, studios in Petoskey)
WCZW (107.9) - oldies (Charlevoix); simulcast of WCCW-FM Traverse City

Camping
Petoskey State Park is located on the Little Traverse Bay between Petoskey & Harbor Springs
Camp Pet-O-Se-Ga is located east of Petoskey on Pickerel Lake
Wilderness State Park is located north of Petoskey in Cross Village

External Links

HARBOR SPRINGS, MICHIGAN

Harbor Springs is a city and resort community in Emmet County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 1,567 at the 2000 census.
Harbor Springs is in a sheltered bay on the north shore of the Little Traverse Bay on Lake Michigan. The Little Traverse Lighthouse is a historic lighthouse on the Harbor Point peninsula that forms the natural harbor there. M-119 connects with US 31 7 miles (11 km) east and south at Bay View, with Petoskey just another 4 miles (6.4 km) away on the south side of the harbor. The area is known for its historic summer resorts, such as Wequetonsing, which was founded by Illinois businessmen and lawyers Henry Stryker, III, and Henry Brigham McClure, both of whom were interconnected with the Jacob Bunn industrial dynasty of Illinois.

Founded by the Jesuits, Harbor Springs was once called L'Arbre Croche, which means Crooked Tree. In 1847, L'Arbre Croche had the largest concentration of Native Americans in Michigan.  French traders renamed the area Petit Traverse, or Little Traverse, when they arrived in the area. The village was eventually incorporated as Harbor Springs in 1880.

One of the city's more prominent residents was Ephraim Shay (1839–1916), known for his invention of the Shay locomotive. The hexagonal shaped house he built in downtown Harbor Springs still stands today and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The local elementary school is named after him.[4]
Another building of interest is the Douglas House on the shore of Lake Michigan. Designed by noted architect Richard Meier and completed in 1973, this house is one of 150 structures listed in 2007 as America's Favorite Architecture.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2), all land. Harbor Springs has a lot to offer during the summer months, including beaches, sailing schools, marinas, multiple golf courses, bike paths, hiking trails, ice cream shops, candy stores, coffee shops and various summer vacation communities. In the winter months the two ski resorts Nub's Nob and Boyne Highlands offer over 678 acres of skiable terrain as well as terrain parks and various trails for snow shoeing & cross-country skiing. When Little Traverse Bay freezes over in the winter months, many people venture out on the ice for ice fishing and ice boating. Harbor Springs is just a few miles from neighboring Petoskey, Michigan, which is on the other side of the bay and is visible with the naked eye, and offers a wider variety of activities including a multiplex movie theater, a thriving downtown area of its own, and several big-box stores.

At the 2010 Census Harbor Springs had a population of 1,194. The racial and ethnic makeup of the population was 92.0% White, 4.8% Native American, 0.8% Asian, 0.3% Native American, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.1% from some other race and 2.0% from two or more races. 0.7% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.
As of the census of 2000, there were 1,567 people, 683 households, and 383 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,208.9 per square mile (465.4/km²). There were 1,086 housing units at an average density of 837.8 per square mile (322.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 91.70% White, 0.19% African American, 5.87% Native American, 0.19% Asian, and 2.04% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.57% of the population.
There were 683 households out of which 23.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.0% were married couples living together, 7.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 43.8% were non-families. 39.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.88.


In the city the population was spread out with 20.4% under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 22.8% from 25 to 44, 28.3% from 45 to 64, and 23.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47 years. For every 100 females there were 81.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 74.4 males.
The median income for a household in the city was $35,341, and the median income for a family was $46,750. Males had a median income of $29,236 versus $27,167 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,876. About 5.3% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under age 18 and 9.8% of those age 65 or over.

Airports
The nearest airports with scheduled passenger service are in Pellston Regional Airport and Traverse City Cherry Capital Airport.
Harbor Springs Municipal Airport is a public general aviation with no scheduled commercial flights.

Highways
 US 31, while not directly serving Harbor Springs, is accessible at the southern end of M-119 four miles southeast near Bay View.
 M-119 travels around the north side of Little Traverse Bay, through downtown Harbor Springs, and then to a terminus at Cross Village.
 C-77 is a north-south route beginning at Harbor Springs and continuing north to Cross Village.
 C-81 is a north-south route running from just east of the city northerly toward Mackinaw City.

Notable current and former residents of Harbor Springs include:
Constance Cappel (1936 – ), author of Hemingway in Michigan, (Michigan Notable Book, 2000) Sweetgrass and Smoke, Odawa Lanquage and Legends, and The Smallpox Genocide of the Odawa Tribe at L'Arbre Croche, 1763: The History of a North American People.
John C. Danforth, former U.S. Senator, married to former Sally Dobson of Harbor Point.
Robert Klark Graham (June 9,1906 – February 13, 1997), inventor, eugenisist, businessman.
F. James McDonald (1922 – 2010), former president and chief operating officer of General Motors.


MACKINAW CITY, MICHIGAN

Mackinaw City  is a village in Emmet and Cheboygan counties in the U.S. state of Michigan. At the 2000 census the population was 859. The name "Mackinaw City" is something of a misnomer as it is actually a village. The population greatly increases though during the tourist season with seasonal workers for the large number of hotels and other recreational facilities along the Straits of Mackinac. Mackinaw City is at the southern end of the Mackinac Bridge, which allows travel to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. Mackinaw City, along with St. Ignace across the straits, is a base for ferries to Mackinac Island.
According to AAA's 2009 TripTik requests, Mackinaw City is the most popular tourist city in the state of Michigan.[3] Local attractions include Fort Michilimackinac, the Mackinac Bridge, the Mackinaw Crossings shopping mall, Mill Creek, the Old Mackinac Point Light, the Historic Village, the McGulpin Point Light, and the retired US Coast Guard Icebreaker Mackinaw.
The larger portion of the village, in area, is in Wawatam Township, Emmet County, though the downtown district and much of the development lies within Mackinaw Township, Cheboygan County.

When the Europeans arrived in the Straits of Mackinac area the predominant tribes were: three Algonquian tribes, known as the Council of Three Fires: Chippewa (Ojibwe), Ottawa (Odawa), and Potawatomi. Although these were not permanent settlements in the European sense, these tribes frequented this area to fish, hunt, trade, and worship. Mackinac Island, which lies within the Straits of Mackinac to the northeast, appeared to have the shape of a turtle. This image led the Native Americans here to believe that the turtle contributed to life's beginnings.
The first European to pass the site of Mackinaw City was Jean Nicolet, sent out from Quebec City by Samuel Champlain in 1633 to explore and map the western Great Lakes, and to establish new contacts and trading partnerships with the Indian tribes there.[4] His reports resulted in the French government providing funding to send settlers, missionaries, traders, and soldiers to the Great Lakes region. Although Father Jacques Marquette had established a mission on Mackinac Island (which was shortly moved to St. Ignace), Mackinaw City's first European settlement came in 1715 with Fort Michilimackinac. This fort was a fairly small garrison that housed French civilians inside the fort walls, but allowed them to garden, hunt, and fish outside the fort walls.
At the end of the French and Indian War, the British took possession of this area, but they did allow the French civilians to live within the fort's walls as they were very valuable to the fur trade. As a part of Pontiac's Rebellion, Chippewa and Fox warriors captured the fort on June 2, 1763 during the baggatiway game surprise attack. The British were kicked out and did not return until the following spring under the agreement that they would trade more fairly with the Native Americans. The British abandoned this fort during the American Revolutionary War. From 1779-81, the British Army moved the fort, including its buildings, to Mackinac Island, where they established Fort Mackinac. What they did not take with them, they burned; this was so that if the Americans did make it to the Mackinac Straits area, they could not use Michilimackinac.
In 1857, two men by the names of Conkling and Searles platted the development of what would become Mackinaw City as it is today. The original designs allowed for the northern portion to be left as a park for two main reasons: preserve the area that was once Fort Michilimackinac and for the possibility that a lighthouse may be built in the town. The village would become a very pivotal port for trains (beginning in the 1890s) and automobiles crossing the Straits of Mackinac. Car transportation lasted from the early 1900s to 1957 with the completion of the Mackinac Bridge. Train transportation ran through the Straits until 1984. This is still an important port city for tourists traveling by passenger ferry boat to Mackinac Island using the Arnold, Shepler's, and Star Line services.
Through the course of time, the main industry of Mackinaw City became almost strictly tourist-oriented, with other civic services such as postal service, police, firefighting, schooling, etc. Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse was built in 1892 in the same northern park that was originally allotted for its construction. This lighthouse would eventually replace McGulpin Point Light, which was built in the 1870s in the far western end of the village limits. When the Mackinac Bridge was completed in 1957, the Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse was decommissioned immediately. Also, a grant was provided to the Mackinac Island State Park Commission, which owned the property at the Bridge's southern terminus, to begin archeological excavations of the Michilimackinac ruins. Ultimately, a reconstruction of the fort to its 1770s appearance would ensue.[5] Camping, which began in Michilimackinac State Park in 1907, was halted in 1971 as a Maritime Park was opened in 1972 around the lighthouse. This park was shut down in 1990, but Old Mackinac Point Lighthouse was opened to the public in 2004. Mill Creek State Park, which includes the area believed to be where Mill Creek's sawmill once flourished when Mackinac Island was being settled, is located about five miles (8 km) southeast of the village along U.S. Highway 23.

Highways
 I-75 is a major north-south freeway running the length of the state. From the Ohio border just north of Toledo, it proceeds northerly via Monroe, Detroit, Flint, Saginaw and Grayling, crosses the Mackinac Bridge after passing through the village and continues on to the Upper Peninsula and Sault Ste. Marie.
 US 23 has its northern terminus in the village.[6] It is designated as the "Sunrise Side Coastal Highway", and follows the Lake Huron shoreline to the south.
 US 31ends at I-75 four miles (6 km) south of the village,[7] continuing southerly toward Traverse City and Muskegon.
 M-108 was a short spur route from I-75.
 C-81 is an County-Designated Highway running southerly toward Harbor Springs and Petoskey.

Mackinaw City is at the tip of the mitten formed by the Lower Peninsula of Michigan. This makes it the terminus for several important Northern Michigan highways, and the junction for all routes from the Lower Peninsula to the Upper Peninsula via the Mackinac Bridge.
The Mackinac or Mackinaw Trail is a historically important route to and from the community, both from the north and the south. The trail, was first used by the tribes of Michigan, and surveyed between Saginaw and Mackinac in 1835, by Lieutenant Benjamin Poole of the 3rd U.S. Artillery.[8] (In Saginaw, Mackinaw Street closely follows Poole's route, which then continues in the general direction of present-day Midland, while Mackinaw Street twists north, becoming Mackinaw Road and following a section line into Bay County.)

Ferry service
Three ferry companies operate out of Mackinaw City, connecting tourists and commuters to Mackinac Island: north and south Arnold Line, Sheplers Ferry and the Star Line.

Railways
The New York Central's (NYC) Michigan Central subsidiary, the Pennsylvania Railroad's (PRR) Grand Rapids and Indiana Railroad subsidiary, and other rail lines provided passenger traffic on trains such as the Northern Arrow to Mackinaw City. After the NYC and PRR merged to create the ill-fated Penn Central in 1968, rail traffic diminished and the rail infrastructure deteriorated. The state invested greatly into the failing railways and established the Michigan Northern Railway to operate passenger and freight operations in the early 1980s. Despite sizable patronage, passenger services, as well as freight, operated in the red, prompting the state government to reassess its commitment to existence of the Michigan Northern Railway. All subsidies terminated in 1984, and the lines were sold to CSX Transportation in 1987, which dismantled the tracks shortly thereafter.[9]
The former Michigan Central line to Mackinaw City was rededicated in 2008 as the North Central State Trail, providing a public right-of-way from Mackinaw City to Gaylord, Michigan.

Air
The nearest airports with scheduled passenger service are in Pellston Regional Airport,[10] Traverse City Cherry Capital Airport and Alpena County Regional Airport in the Lower peninsula and Chippewa County International Airport in Sault Ste. Marie, in the eastern Upper peninsula.

Geography
According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 7.6 square miles (19.6 km²), of which 3.4 square miles (8.7 km²) of it is land and 4.2 square miles (10.9 km²) or 55.54% of it is water.
Mackinaw City is considered to be part of Northern Michigan

Amenities
Mackinaw City's central shopping district is located along Central Avenue downtown. Many of the shops sell fudge, T-shirts, and toffee. Also located downtown is a small outdoor shopping mall called Mackinaw Crossings, which features a movie theater. As a tourist city, it has a larger amount of hotels that many other communities.

Demographics
As of the census of 2000, there were 859 people, 404 households, and 244 families residing in the village. The population density was 255.3 people per square mile (98.7/km²). There were 630 housing units at an average density of 187.3 per square mile (72.4/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 93.02% White, 0.12% African American, 4.54% Native American, 0.12% Asian, and 2.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.81% of the population.
There were 404 households out of which 21.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 9.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.6% were non-families. 34.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.12 and the average family size was 2.67.
In the village the population was spread out with 20.6% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 24.9% from 25 to 44, 30.7% from 45 to 64, and 18.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females there were 88.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.3 males.
The median income for a household in the village was $37,031, and the median income for a family was $43,125. Males had a median income of $31,771 versus $30,125 for females. The per capita income for the village was $18,725. About 7.5% of families and 9.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.5% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.

Village Officials
Village Manager - Don Beavers
Village President - Jeff Hingston
Village Clerk - Lana Jaggi
Village Treasurer - Patty Peppler
Superintendent of Public Works - Jim Tamlyn
Community Development Director - Don Beavers
Recreation Director/Harbormaster - Dave Paquet
Police Chief - Pat Wyman
Water, Wastewater Superintendent - Pat Rivera
Planning Commission Chair - Rob Most

Other affiliations
It is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Gaylord.


PELLSTON, MICHIGAN

Pellston is a village in Emmet County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 771 at the 2000 census. The village is the home of Pellston Regional Airport. Its motto is "Icebox of the Nation"; Pellston recorded the state of Michigan's record low temperature, a frigid −53 °F (−47 °C). in 1933, and every winter is regularly called out in national weather reports, along with towns like Big Piney, Wyoming, Fraser, Colorado and International Falls, Minnesota, as one of the coldest spots in the nation.
The village is on the boundary between Maple River Township and McKinley Township on US Highway 31. Interstate 75 is about 10 miles (16 km) east of Pellston. Mackinaw City and the Mackinac Bridge is approximately 18 miles (29 km) north and Petoskey is about 20 miles (32 km) southwest of the village. The University of Michigan Biological Station is on nearby Douglas Lake.

As of the census of 2000, there were 771 people, 260 households, and 199 families residing in the village. The population density was 402.8 per square mile (155.9/km²). There were 308 housing units at an average density of 160.9 per square mile (62.3/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 89.75% White, 0.65% African American, 6.49% Native American, 0.26% Asian, 0.13% Pacific Islander, and 2.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.78% of the population.
There were 260 households out of which 43.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.1% were non-families. 16.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.97 and the average family size was 3.33.
In the village the population was spread out with 33.3% under the age of 18, 6.9% from 18 to 24, 32.6% from 25 to 44, 18.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 98.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.0 males.
The median income for a household in the village was $37,292, and the median income for a family was $39,911. Males had a median income of $25,956 versus $20,013 for females. The per capita income for the village was $13,047. About 10.8% of families and 13.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.0% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over.
The University of Michigan has their biological station in Pellston.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.9 square miles (4.9 km2), all land.

Pellston is known regionally for its cold temperatures. It is often mentioned on television and radio because of its nightly lows.

EMMET COUNTY, MICHIGAN

Emmet County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 31,437. The county seat is Petoskey.
The county was formed April 1, 1840, from Mackinac County. It was first named Tonedagana County and renamed Emmet County on March 8, 1843. Emmet County remained attached to Mackinac County for administrative purposes until county government was organized in 1853. The county was named for the Irish patriot Robert Emmet, who was hanged as a traitor to the British government at the age of 23. Sixteen counties were renamed in 1843 and five were given names of Irish origin, supposedly in deference to the increasing presence of settlers in Michigan with an Irish background. See List of Michigan county name etymologies.
Emmet County is located at the top of the mitten-shaped Lower Peninsula of Michigan, with Lake Michigan to the west, the Straits of Mackinac to the north, Cheboygan County to the east, and Charlevoix County to the south.
Emmet County is home to Michigan's most endangered species and one of the most endangered species in the world: the Hungerford's Crawling Water Beetle. The species lives in only five locations in the world, two of which are in Emmet County. One of these, a two and a half mile stretch downstream from the Douglas Road crossing of the East Branch of the Maple River supports the only stable population of the Hungerford's Crawling Water Beetle, with roughly 1000 specimens. This area is largely within and along the boundary of the University of Michigan Biological Station there. The other location in Emmet County, near the Oliver Road crossing of the Carp Lake River, revealed 4 adult specimens in 1997, but erosion at the road seems to have harmed the habitat and no specimens were found in the last survey conducted in 2003.

Ottawa history records that Emmet County was thickly populated by a race of Indians that they called the Mush-co-desh, which means, "the Prairie tribe." The Mush-co-desh had an agrarian society and were said to have "shaped the land by making the woodland into prairie as they abandoned their old worn out gardens which formed grassy plains". Ottawa tradition claims that they slaughtered from forty to fifty thousand Mush-co-desh and drove the rest from the land after the Mush-co-desh insulted an Ottawa war party.

When European explorers and settlers first arrived in the area it became part of New France, Ottawa and Ojibwe Indians were the principal inhabitants. The French established Fort Michilimackinac in about 1715. The British took the fort in 1761 and continued to use it as a trading post. In 1763, Ojibwe Indians took the fort as a part of Pontiac's Rebellion and held it for a year before the British retook it. The British abandoned the wooden fort in 1781 after building the limestone Fort Mackinac on nearby Mackinac Island. An Indian community on the lakeshore in the western part of the county continued to thrive after the British abandoned the fort.

In the 1840s, Indian villages lined the Lake Michigan shore from present-day Harbor Springs to Cross Village. The area was mostly reserved for native tribes by treaty provisions with the U.S. federal government until 1875.

In 1847, a group of Mormons settled on nearby Beaver Island and established a "kingdom" led by "King" James Jesse Strang. There were bitter disputes between Strang's followers and other white settlers. Strang, seeking to strengthen his position became a member of the Michigan State House of Representatives. In January 1853, he pushed through legislation titled, "An act to organize the County of Emmet", which enlarged Emmet County by attaching the nearby Lake Michigan islands to the county as well as a portion of Cheboygan County. Further, it attached the old Charlevoix County, which was originally named Keskkauko County and was as yet still unorganized, as a township of Emmet County. Due to Strang's influence, Mormons came to dominate county government, causing an exodus of many non-Mormon settlers to neighboring areas. In 1855, the non-Mormon resistance succeeded in getting the Michigan Legislature to reorganize the County of Emmet with the islands, including Beaver Island and North and South Manitou Island, set off into the separate Manitou County, which effectively eliminated Mormons from Emmet County government.

On April 27, 1857 an election selected Little Traverse (now named Harbor Springs) as the county seat. However, at about this time, a group of investors were trying to promote development at Mackinaw City and due to their influence, in February 1858, the State Legislature passed an act establishing Mackinaw City as the county seat. The Emmet County Board of Supervisors protested that the county seat had already been established at Little Traverse, and in 1861, the act was repealed as unconstitutional. In a contested election in 1867, residents voted to move the county seat to Charlevoix, which was upheld by a Circuit Court decision in 1868. However, in 1869, Charlevoix County was split off from Emmet County and its county seat was now in another county. No provisions for official relocation were authorized, although Harbor Springs served as the unofficial county seat until April 1902, when the present county seat of Petoskey was selected in a county-wide election.

Charlevoix Township was organized in 1853 and included all ot the nine townships presently in the southern half of the county. In the 1855 reorganization, four new townships were created by the State Legislature:
La Croix Township (name changed to Cross Village Township in 1875)
Little Traverse Township
Bear Creek Township
Old Fort Mackinac (later absorbed into other townships)

In 1855, county supervisors also established Arbour Croche Township and Utopia Township. The state had inadvertently drawn boundaries for Little Traverse and Bear Creek that such that one area was included in both. The county supervisors Arbour Croche was defined as having the same boundaries as the state-defined Little Traverse Township, excluding the area overlapping with Bear Creek. Eventually the name Arbour Croche disappeared in favor of Little Traverse.

The township of Utopia was later absorbed into other townships.
In 1877, six additional townships were organized:
Bliss Township
Friendship Township
Littlefield Township
Maple River Township
Pleasantview Township
Readmond Township

Center Township was added in 1878 and Carp Lake Township in 1879. Resort Township and Springvale Township, Michigan were formed in 1880, but were at that time part of Charlevoix County. Those townships, along with Bear Creek, experienced numerous boundary changes. The now defunct townships of Bear Lake and Spring Lake were created out of portions of these townships. In 1897, the portions of these townships remaining in Emmet County were absorbed into Bear Creek and Springvale Townships.

Also organized in 1897 were West Traverse Township (from portions of Friendship and Little Traverse Townships) and Egleston Township (name changed to McKinley Township in 1903). In 1923, Wawatam Township was the last township organized in the county, when it was detached from Carp Lake Township.

GEOGRAPHY
According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 882.26 square miles (2,285.0 km2), of which 467.82 square miles (1,211.6 km2) (or 53.03%) is land and 414.44 square miles (1,073.4 km2) (or 46.97%) is water.[3]
Emmet County is considered to be part of Northern Michigan

HIGHWAYS
Highways
 I-75
 US 31
 US 131
 M-68
 M-119
 C-58
 C-64
 C-66
 C-71
 C-77
 C-81

ADJACENT COUNTIES
Mackinac County - northeast
Cheboygan County - east
Charlevoix County - south

DEMOGRAPHICS
As of the census of 2000, there were 31,437 people, 12,577 households, and 8,527 families residing in the county. The population density was 67 people per square mile (26/km²). There were 18,554 housing units at an average density of 40 per square mile (15/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.33% White, 0.47% Black or African American, 3.11% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 1.47% from two or more races. 0.91% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 23.6% were of German, 11.4% English, 11.3% Irish, 9.0% Polish and 8.4% American ancestry according to Census 2000. 96.9% spoke English and 1.1% Spanish as their first language.
There were 12,577 households out of which 31.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.90% were married couples living together, 8.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.20% were non-families. 26.90% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.97.
In the county the population was spread out with 25.30% under the age of 18, 7.10% from 18 to 24, 28.10% from 25 to 44, 25.20% from 45 to 64, and 14.30% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 96.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.70 males.
The median income for a household in the county was $40,222, and the median income for a family was $48,140. Males had a median income of $33,385 versus $24,173 for females. The per capita income for the county was $21,070. About 4.50% of families and 7.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.30% of those under age 18 and 7.80% of those age 65 or over.

GOVERNMENT
The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

COUNTY COURTHOUSE
Emmet County Courthouse 
200 Division St. 
Petoskey, MI 49770 
Telephone: (616) 348-1744

County Clerk has birth, marriage and death records from 1867, 
divorce records from 1875, court and naturalization records
from 1800’s and some military records[1]

EMMET COUNTY ELECTED OFFICIALS
Prosecuting Attorney: James Linderman
Sheriff: Peter A. Wallin
County Clerk: Gail A. Martin
County Treasurer: Marilyn May
Register of Deeds: Michele Stine
Drain Commissioner: Arden Bawkey

CITIES, VILLAGES AND TOWNSHIPS
Cities
Harbor Springs
Petoskey

Villages
Alanson
Mackinaw City
Pellston

Unincorporated
Bay View

Townships
Bear Creek Township
Bliss Township
Carp Lake Township
Center Township
Cross Village Township
Friendship Township
Little Traverse Township
Littlefield Township
Maple River Township
McKinley Township
Pleasantview Township
Readmond Township
Resort Township
Springvale Township
Wawatam Township
West Traverse Township

PARKS AND RECREATIONS
The Headlands is a 550 acre park located on the shores of Lake Michigan. The park contains woodlands, over two miles of undeveloped shoreline and many species of rare and endangered plant life. Marked trails are provided for hiking, bicycling and cross-country skiing. In May 2011, Headlands Park was awarded International Dark Sky Park designation by the International Dark-Sky Association.

EXTERNAL LINKS


CHARELVOIX COUNTY, MICHIGAN

Charlevoix County is a county in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 26,090. The county seat is Charlevoix.

Lake Charlevoix, with 17,200 acres (7,000 ha) surface area and 56 miles (90 km) of shoreline, is a very prominent feature of the county. According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 1,390.76 square miles (3,602.1 km2), of which 416.84 square miles (1,079.6 km2) (or 29.97%) is land and 973.92 square miles (2,522.4 km2) (or 70.03%) is water.
The county is considered to be part of Northern Michigan.
Gull, Hat, Pismire, and Shoe Islands, which are part of the Beaver Island archipelago, form the Lake Michigan division of the Michigan Islands National Wildlife Refuge, and two of them are part of the Michigan Islands Wilderness Area.

As of the census of 2000, there were 26,090 people, 10,400 households, and 7,311 families residing in the county. The population density was 63 people per square mile (24/km²). There were 15,370 housing units at an average density of 37 per square mile (14/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.31% White, 0.17% Black or African American, 1.54% Native American, 0.23% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 1.25% from two or more races. 1.04% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 21.8% were of German, 12.0% English, 11.0% American, 10.6% Irish and 8.4% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000. 97.3% spoke English and 1.1% Spanish as their first language.
There were 10,400 households out of which 31.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.40% were married couples living together, 8.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.80% were non-families. 25.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 2.96.
In the county the population was spread out with 25.90% under the age of 18, 6.50% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 25.20% from 45 to 64, and 14.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 97.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.80 males.
The median income for a household in the county was $39,788, and the median income for a family was $46,260. Males had a median income of $32,457 versus $22,447 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,130. About 5.40% of families and 8.00% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.00% of those under age 18 and 5.90% of those age 65 or over.

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

Beaver Island has a unique history, particularly because of the temporary influence of James J. Strang, who founded the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangite). Strang moved his followers to Beaver Island in 1848, and they are known as Strangites.
There are ten recognized Michigan historical markers in the county:[7]
Big Rock Point Nuclear Power Plant
Boyne City United Methodist Church
Charlevoix Depot
Greensky Hill Mission
Horace S. Harsha House
Horton Bay
John Porter and Eva Porter Estate
Mormon Kingdom
Mormon Print Shop
Norwood Township Hall


MACKINAW COUNTY, MICHIGAN

Mackinac County is a county in the Upper Peninsula of the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the population was 11,943. The county seat is St. Ignace. The county was formerly known as Michilimackinac County, and it was created as one of the first counties of the Michigan Territory in 1818.
The county's name is claimed to be a corruption of the French term "Michilimackinac," which referred to the Straits of Mackinac area as well as the French settlement at the tip of the lower peninsula.[3] See and compare List of Michigan county name etymologies, List of Michigan counties, and List of abolished U.S. counties.

Michilimackinac County was created on October 26, 1818, by proclamation of territorial governor Lewis Cass. The county originally took up the Lower Peninsula of Michigan north of Macomb County and almost the entire present Upper Peninsula. At the time of founding, the county seat was the community of Michilimackinac Island on Michilimackinac Island, later known as Mackinac Island, Michigan. The county was reorganized in 1849 as Mackinac County. In 1882 the county seat was moved from Mackinac Island to St. Ignace.

According to the 2000 census, the county has a total area of 2,100.55 square miles (5,440.4 km2), of which 1,021.58 square miles (2,645.9 km2) (or 48.63%) is land and 1,078.96 square miles (2,794.5 km2) (or 51.37%) is water.[4]
It is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Marquette.[5][6]
St. Ignace is the northern terminus of the Mackinac Bridge.
Mackinac Island is within the county.

As of the census of 2000, there were 11,943 people, 5,067 households, and 3,410 families residing in the county. The population density was 12 persons per square mile (5/km²). There were 9,413 housing units at an average density of 9/sq mi (4/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 80.07% White, 0.20% Black or African American, 14.21% Native American, 0.31% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.28% from other races, and 4.92% from two or more races. 0.90% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 18.7% were of German, 9.4% English, 8.1% Irish, 7.3% French, 6.0% American and 6.0% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000. 97.6% spoke English as their first language.
There were 5,067 households out of which 26.50% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.60% were married couples living together, 8.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.70% were non-families. 28.00% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.81.
In the county the population was spread out with 22.20% under the age of 18, 6.00% from 18 to 24, 25.10% from 25 to 44, 28.40% from 45 to 64, and 18.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 99.70 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.20 males.
The median income for a household in the county was $33,356, and the median income for a family was $39,929. Males had a median income of $30,805 versus $22,753 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,777. About 7.20% of families and 10.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.70% of those under age 18 and 8.40% of those age 65 or over.

The county government operates the jail, maintains rural roads, operates the major local courts, keeps files of deeds and mortgages, maintains vital records, administers public health regulations, and participates with the state in the provision of welfare and other social services. The county board of commissioners controls the budget but has only limited authority to make laws or ordinances. In Michigan, most local government functions — police and fire, building and zoning, tax assessment, street maintenance, etc. — are the responsibility of individual cities and townships.

There are 34 official state historical markers in the County:
Across the Peninsula
American Fur Company Store
Battlefield of 1814
Biddle House
Bois Blanc Island
British Cannon
British Landing
Early Missionary Bark Chapel
Epoufette
Fort de Buade
Fort Holmes
Grand Hotel
Gros Cap Island & St. Helena Island
Historic Fort Mackinac
Indian Dormitory
Island House (Mackinac Island)
Lake Michigan
Lake View Hotel
Little Stone Church
Mackinac Conference
Mackinac Island
Mackinac Straits
Market Street
Mission Church
Mission House
Northernmost Point of Lake Michigan
Old Agency House
Round Island Lighthouse
Sainte Anne Church
St. Ignace
St. Ignace Mission
Skull Cave
Trinity Church (Mackinac Island)
Wawashkamo Golf Club

BOYNE CITY, MICHIGAN

Boyne City  is a city in Charlevoix County in the U.S. state of Michigan. The population was 3,503 at the 2000 census.
Boyne City is at the southeast end of the east arm of Lake Charlevoix, where the Boyne River enters the lake. It is at the corners of four townships, though it is politically independent: Evangeline Township is to the northwest, Melrose Township to the northeast, Boyne Valley Township to the southeast, and Wilson Township to the southwest.

M-75 connects with US 131 twice, at Walloon Lake about 6 miles (9.7 km) to the northeast and at Boyne Falls about 6 miles (9.7 km) to the southeast. County roads run west out of the city along the north and south shores of Lake Charlevoix.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 5.2 square miles (13 km2), of which, 3.9 square miles (10 km2) of it is land and 1.3 square miles (3.4 km2) of it (25.24%) is water.

As of the census of 2000, there were 3,503 people, 1,468 households, and 932 families residing in the city. The population density was 896.7 per square mile (345.9/km²). There were 1,935 housing units at an average density of 495.3 per square mile (191.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.92% White, 0.11% African American, 1.14% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.40% from other races, and 1.20% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.74% of the population.
There were 1,468 households out of which 31.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.5% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.01.
In the city the population was spread out with 26.4% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 22.0% from 45 to 64, and 15.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.6 males.
The median income for a household in the city was $35,819, and the median income for a family was $44,096. Males had a median income of $29,558 versus $22,583 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,030. About 8.9% of families and 11.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.2% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.


CHARLEVOIX, MICHIGAN

Charlevoix  is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 2,994. It is the county seat of Charlevoix County.[3]
Charlevoix Township is a separate municipal entity that completely surrounds the city and has 1,697 year round population. Typical of Northern Michigan towns, Charlevoix has a significant seasonal tourist population in the summer.

The city is situated between Lake Michigan and the western end of Lake Charlevoix, which drains into Lake Michigan through the short Round Lake/Pine River complex in the heart of downtown Charlevoix. The Charlevoix South Pier Light Station marks the opening of the channel onto Lake Michigan. Charlevoix's Round Lake has been called the best natural harbor on Lake Michigan. The only way to get from Lake Michigan to East Jordan, Boyne City and other sites on Lake Charlevoix by boat is via Charlevoix. As a result, much commercial, industrial, and recreational boat traffic passes through Charlevoix.

The city of Charlevoix has a U.S. Coast Guard station located in its vicinity. Station Charlevoix has served in the waters of Lake Charlevoix and Lake Michigan for over one hundred years. The station originated in 1898 on the south break wall of the Pine River Channel, leading into Lake Michigan. It was officially commissioned as a United States Lifesaving Service Station July 5, 1900. During the early 1960s, the station was relocated to its present day location along the Pine River Channel's Lake Charlevoix end. The area of response for Station Charlevoix runs from Cross Village down to Leland, extending into Lake Michigan through Beaver Island and the North and South Fox Islands, and covers numerous inland lakes and waterways. Spring through late fall the 41' UTB and the 25' RB-S are in operation and during the winter months, the 14' ice skiff is put into operation. There is also a U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla based at the Station. There are some USCG Auxiliary surface facilities occasionally moored at Station Charlevoix.

Major highways
 US 31 is a major highway running through the heart of the city. It continues southerly toward Traverse City and Muskegon and northerly toward Petoskey to a terminus near Mackinaw City.
 M-66 terminates at US 31 in Charlevoix and continues southerly through East Jordan and Kalkaska en route to the southern part of the state.
 C-56 begins at US 31 just northeast of the city and continues east-southeasterly toward Boyne City.
 C-65 ends at US 31 immediately west of the M-66 junction on the south side of the city. This route continues southerly toward Ellsworth and Central Lake.

Rail
Regular intercity passenger train service ended on September 1, 1962 after the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway (C&O) discontinued Traverse City, Michigan - Charlevoix - Petoskey, Michigan service. Freight rail service ended between Charlevoix and Williamsburg, Michigan in 1982 after Chessie System abandoned the track. The state of Michigan purchased the track between Charlevoix and Petoskey, Michigan from the Chessie System Railroads and contracted Michigan Northern Railway to operate it. This section of track was removed in the 1990s because of a series of washouts and no rail freight customers in Charlevoix. Sections of this rail line now serve as a bicycle trail. The Charlevoix railroad depot now serves as a museum for the Charlevoix Historical Society.

Air
Charlevoix Municipal Airport (IATA: CVX, ICAO: KCVX) is a public airport. In addition to private planes, the airport commonly offers flights to Detroit Metropolitan Airport, Beaver Island (via Island Airways) and the Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City.
Scheduled airlines also serve Pellston Regional Airport,H Traverse City Cherry Capital Airport and Alpena County Regional Airport in the Lower peninsula.

History
Charlevoix is named after Pierre François Xavier de Charlevoix, a French explorer who travelled the Great Lakes and was said to have stayed the night on Fisherman's Island one night during a harsh storm. It was during this time that Native Americans were thought to have lived in the Pine River valley.
Soon after its formation in the 1850s, Charlevoix entered into a short lived conflict with Jesse Strang, leader and namesake of the Strangite Mormons, and then king of Beaver Island. Relations between Charlevoix residents and the Strangites were often tense. In 1853, a gunfight broke out between the two groups as the townspeople refused to hand over a man who was called for jury duty on the island, an event known locally as The Battle of Pine River. When Strang was assassinated on June 20, 1856, many believed residents from Charlevoix to be responsible.

Charlevoix was permanently settled in the post-Civil War era. In the 1880s, Several professors from the University of Chicago formed the Chicago Club Summer Home association. It wasn't long before the city became known as a resort destination. With three summer associations (the Belvedere Club, Sequanota Club, and the Chicago Club), a number of extravagant summer hotels, including The Inn and The Beach, and with rail service at two train depots on the Pere Marquette Railway line, (one depot for the Belvedere Club on the south side of Round Lake and one on the north side near the Chicago Club), Charlevoix became known as one of the nation's finest summer communities.
Charlevoix was once a popular destination for many passenger liners, including the Manitou, Alabama, North American, South American, Milwaukee Clipper, Illinois, and others.

During Prohibition, Charlevoix became a popular place for gang members from the Chicago area. The Colonial Club, a restaurant and gambling joint on the city's north side became known as a popular place for the Midwest's most powerful and influential. John Koch, the club's owner, kept automobile license number "2", only second to the governor - a telling sign of his influence.

The converted lumber barge Keuka served as a blind pig and speakeasy and sailed nightly between Boyne City and Charlevoix, hosting its guests in relative comfort. A murder aboard the ship and the pressure of US Treasury Department surveillance, however, forced the owner to scuttle the vessel in Lake Charlevoix.

November 18, 1958, Charlevoix City Hall served as a makeshift morgue for the bodies of crewmen of the SS Carl D. Bradley after the lake freighter foundered in Lake Michigan during a severe storm. The USCGC Sundew, stationed at Charlevoix, was one of the first vessels to arrive at the search area and played a pivotal role in that night's rescue of the two surviving crewmen.

January 7, 1971 An unarmed USAF B-52C-45-BO, 54-2666, of the 9th BW, Westover AFB, Massachusetts, crashed into Lake Michigan near Charlevoix during a practice bomb run, exploding on impact.[citation needed] Only a small amount of wreckage, two life vests, and some spilled fuel was found in Little Traverse Bay. The bomber went down six nautical miles from the Bay Shore Air Force Radar Site and close to the Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant. Nine crew KWF.[5]
The City of Charlevoix suffered economically from the 1950s to the 1980s as the manufacturing base largely evaporated, the train lines to the city ceased operating, and the larger tourist hotels fell out of business, leaving many empty buildings. The city has recovered from this slump via many redevelopment projects that have improved the downtown area. The 1980s also brought many condominium developments in the area.
Charlevoix was home to Michigan's first nuclear power plant, Big Rock Point, which operated from 1962 to 1997.

Another major employer in the Charlevoix area has been the Medusa cement plant, located south of town off of US 31 near Fisherman's Island State Park. In the late 1990s the cement plant was bought out by Cemex, a transnational company from Mexico. In 2000 Cemex sold the plant to St Marys Cement Group. The cement plant is a frequent port of call for the oldest freighter on the great lakes, St. Marys Challenger.
After the 1996 murder of JonBenét Ramsey, who spent her summers in Charlevoix and had won a pageant in the town, Charlevoix became a regular haven for tabloid photographers, hoping to catch a glimpse of the Ramsey family. John Ramsey, JonBenet's father and husband of the late Patsy Ramsey, still resides in Charlevoix.

The infamous murderer Richard Loeb's family owned a summer estate in Charlevoix in the 1920s.
For a list of historical landmarks, see Charlevoix County.

Special Events
Petunia Planting- Petunia planting began in 1982 when "Keep Charlevoix Beautiful" organization member Dale Boss had a vision to line the streets of the city with thousands of petunias from the north side of the city limit all the way to the south and "Opporation Petunia" began. Now, every Thursday before memorial day hundreds of residents gather to plant over 60,000 petunias on up and down Main street.

Venetian-The Venetian festival began in 1931 with a very simple boat show in Charlevoix's Round Lake and has now grown into a week long festival bringing in tens of thousands of people and costs $200,000. Venetian now includes two night of some of the best fireworks in Northern Michigan, big name concerts, a parade, athletic events, a carnival, a boat parade, and many more family friendly and adult activities.

Apple Fest- The 30th annual Apple festival was celebrated in October 2008. The Apple festival celebrates one of Northern Michigan's most prominent fruits, the apple. It gives local farmers the chance to sell their harvest right in the downtown Charlevoix area. The festival also includes pony rides, face painting, a craft show and many more activities to draw in tourism.

Car Raffle- Charlevoix has an annual car raffle, sponsored by Charlevoix Chamber of Commerce, to generate funds for capital improvements and operations.[9]
Art and Craft Show- The art and craft show is held one weekend in July each summer in downtown Charlevoix. 150 artists and craftsmen come from all over the United States to sell their work.

Tourism
Charlevoix bills itself as "Charlevoix the Beautiful" on its promotional literature and on municipal signs around the city. This moniker was also the name of a book by prominent local "stone house" architect Earl Young.[10][11][12]
Nearby Northern Michigan tourist destinations are:
Beaver Island
Lake Charlevoix
Petoskey, Michigan
Harbor Springs, Michigan
Horton Bay, Michigan,[13] childhood stomping grounds of Ernest Hemingway
Traverse City, Michigan
the Ironton Ferry
Sleeping Bear Dunes National Seashore
Common annual festivals in Charlevoix are:
Venetian festival
Apple Festival
Waterfront art fair

Media and Culture
Charlevoix is primarily served by four newspapers: the Charlevoix Courier, the Petoskey News Review, the Traverse City Record-Eagle, and the Detroit Free Press. Most television and radio stations are based in Traverse City and serve all of the Northern Michigan region including Charlevoix.
Charlevoix has one movie tri-plex theater embedded within its downtown and no big box shopping outlets except for Kmart, having outlawed them after refusing Wal-Mart's proposed store on the edge of the city.
There is a community pool on the north side of town and a bowling alley on the south side near the Charlevoix Municipal Airport. Typical of small towns, high school athletic events are an integral part of Charlevoix's culture. During the winter, the town's basketball team draws much of the locals' attention.
Recently, a skate park was built on the south side of town with the help of donations. The Charlevoix Community Skatepark opened in 2006. The park is supervised and helmets are required. Skateboards, Inline Skates and BMX bikes are allowed.
Several notable golf courses are built around Charlevoix: Belvedere Golf Club, Charlevoix Country Club, Dunmaglas, Antrim Dells, and the nine-hole Charlevoix Municipal Golf Course, which was once eighteen holes as part of the Chicago Club.
Skiing in the area is common winter sport in Northern Michigan, with the closest resort being Boyne Mountain near Boyne City.
Charlevoix used to be a "one stoplight town" until it received a second stoplight in the 1980s at the intersection of M-66 and US 31.
Los Angeles-based singer/songwriter Joe Henry, who spent much of his childhood in Michigan, includes a song entitled 'Charlevoix' on his 1990 album Shuffletown.

Notable Residents of Charlevoix
Robert Boss professional football player
Jeff Drenth, Mid-American Conference cross-country running champion, three time member of United States world cross-country team, and competitor at the 1984 Summer Olympics Trials in the 10,000 metres event.
Ernest Hemingway spent his boyhood summers in the area, setting many of his Nick Adams Stories on or near Lake Charlevoix.
Roger Knutson, author of Flattened Fauna: A Field Guide to Common Animals of Roads, Streets, and Highways (1984) Ten Speed Press ISBN 0-89815-186-4.
Albert Loeb, lawyer and Vice President of Sears and Roebuck who built the Castle Farm test farm complex in Charlevoix.
Richard Albert Loeb, son of Albert, of Leopold and Loeb murder trial fame.
JonBenét Ramsey summered here with her family until her death in 1996, and her family moved here after her murder.
Charles Ransom, philanthropist
Willard J. Smith thirteenth Commandant of the United States Coast Guard.
Glendon Swarthout American author and novelist.
Earl Young, builder of distinctive stone houses
Bob Carey, Athlete, former NFL First Round Draft Choice 1952; First Team All American in football 1951, All-American Shot Putter 1951, and three year basketball starter at Michigan State University 1950-1952.

Geography
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 2.2 square miles (5.7 km2), of which, 2.0 square miles (5.2 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (4.65%) is water.
Charlevoix is part of Northern Michigan.

Demographics
As of the census  of 2000, there were 2,994 people, 1,375 households, and 812 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,465.8 per square mile (566.7/km²). There were 2,096 housing units at an average density of 1,026.2 per square mile (396.7/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.92% White, 0.27% African American, 2.84% Native American, 0.20% Asian, 0.43% from other races, and 1.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.24% of the population.
There were 1,375 households out of which 25.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.7% were married couples living together, 9.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 35.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.14 and the average family size was 2.76.
In the city the population was spread out with 21.6% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 24.2% from 45 to 64, and 19.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 88.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.0 males.
The median income for a household in the city was $35,284, and the median income for a family was $42,853. Males had a median income of $31,544 versus $24,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,319. About 3.7% of families and 9.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.8% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.

Current issues
Charlevoix, like many Michigan resort towns, is suffering from a real estate slump as a result of decreased revenue in Detroit auto manufacturers.

Charlevoix has recently begun to contend with the prospect of urban sprawl. Following the construction of a K-mart plaza development in the 1990s, many businesses and the post office moved to this area. There was significant controversy in the 1990s over the decision to extend water pipes into rural farmland south of Charlevoix in order to build a new Charlevoix High School.  In the early 2000s, Charlevoix, led by Green Party Drain Commissioner JoAnne Beemon, successfully fought off a bid by Walmart to open a store along this new water pipeline on the south edge of town.

From 2006–2008, Charlevoix has offered to host the LaSalle-Griffon Project, a project that seeks to the ruins of a shipwreck that may be Le Griffon.